Egypt – The Forest Of Columns IN Karnak

UPDATED: SEPTEMBER 2020

The Hypostyle hall in the Karnak temple in Luxor, covers an area of more than 55,000 sq ft. andis filled with 134 gigantic sandstone columns arranged in 16 rows, with an average diameter of nearly 10 feet!

12 in the central aisle with open papyrus capitals, once supported a raised 82 feet ceiling and are now around 70 feet high. The rest (61 on either side) have closed papyrus bud capitals and were meant to support two sloping 50 feet high roofs and stand 34 feet tall.

Now consider the timeline – built by Seti I and his son Ramesses II between 1294 – 1213 BC!! Mind boggling? You bet. The Pyramids are older still, by some 1400 years!


MORE EGYPT STORIES & TRAVEL GUIDES

EGYPT TRAVEL GUIDE – ALL YOU NEED TO PLAN A PERFECT TRIP
EGYPT ITINERARY – AN EPIC TEN DAY JOURNEY
PYRAMIDS OF EGYPT – GIZA, SAQQARA & DAHSHUR
KHUFU’S SHIP – THE SOLAR BOAT MUSEUM
INTO THE HEART OF HISTORIC CAIRO
THE TWIN TEMPLES OF ABU SIMBEL
NUBiAN LANDSCAPES – THINGS TO DO IN ASWAN
ABYDOS AND THE RAISING OF THR DJED
STAR GAZING IN DENDERA

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Madhu is an Interior designer turned travel blogger on a long sabbatical to explore the world. When not crafting stories on The Urge To Wander, she's probably Tweeting @theurgetowander or sharing special moments on instagram.com/theurgetowander

73 thoughts on “Egypt – The Forest Of Columns IN Karnak

  1. Wow, this is amazing! You visit some very interesting and cool places.
    Have the carvings in the columns been translated/deciphered? It would be interesting to learn their meaning.

    1. Yes of course….the discovery of the Roseta Stone with inscriptions in three scripts including Greek was the key to unlocking the language and secrets of Egypt! Most of the inscriptions are the cartouches (names) of the Pharaohs and about their individual exploits. Thanks for the interest Fergiemoto 🙂

  2. Absolutely wonderful pictures. You are a really wonderful photographer Madhu, I hope I am not saying this to you for the first time. 🙂

    1. I hope not Cardinal. They are basically a simple, gracious people that deserve their freedom. This post wasn’t about the Pyramids by the way 🙂

    1. Thanks Gilly, I find these more interesting too. We went at dusk and the lighting is spectacular, and crowds thinner.

  3. So incredibly arresting! For sure I’d like to go back in the past and witness how they did all of that! Are all of those images documented in some formal way for study? I could spend a year there just admiring and studying what’s there! Thanks so much for sharing.
    Your ‘food’ post was amazing as well!
    z

    1. I could too! And immerse myself in the stories! I was almost an Egyptologist by the time i returned 🙂 Thanks for your kind words Z

  4. It truly is remarkable. We think that we are so advanced, sometimes I am not so sure. By the way…thanks for introducing me to yet another WordPress Challenge.

    1. Means a lot coming from you Patti! We do consider ourselves fortunate to have been able to experience these wonders. Thank you for stopping by to comment. Hope to see you around 🙂

    1. She does doesn’t she? We are likely adding scale to hers 🙂 It was wonderful visiting Karnak late evening, for the light and the lesser crowds. Thanks for the comment.

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