The Historical Government House Of Takayama

If you have ever been captivated by tales of fierce samurai and feudal warlords, you will love Takayama. Hida-Takayama is said to be one of few cities in Japan to retain its medieval character, particularly in the timber architecture of the old town that dates back to the Edo* era (1603 -1868). A period when the fragmented country transitioned from turbulence under warring chieftains to […]

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Shichigosan At Meiji Jingu

On a Sunday closest to November 15, considered the most auspicious day in the Japanese calender, families descend on Shinto shrines across Japan, to celebrate a rite of passage called Shichi-go-san. The name literally translates to ‘Seven-Five-Three’, indicating a medieval tradition among aristocratic/Samurai families that stipulated that boys and girl stopped getting their hair shaved when they turned three, that boys aged five […]

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The Temple Of Pure Water

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A grand viewing deck to commune with nature. That is the principal attraction of Kiyomizu-dera (Clear Water Temple), a Buddhist shrine near Kyoto, founded in 798 AD, whose main hall is dedicated to the eleven headed, thousand armed Bodhisattva. Highly venerated for its wish granting abilities, and brought out for public viewing only a few times a […]

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Travel My Way

I was on the road when I was nominated for the ‘Travel Your Way‘ contest by Kathryn from Travel with Kat, and didn’t expect to make the September end deadline. Viveka’s kind nomination last week made me realise that the last date had been extended to October 31. So here I am, with just a couple of […]

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The Buddha – Unusual Points Of View

“In fact, everything we encounter in this world with our six senses is an inkblot test. You see what you are thinking and feeling, seldom what you are looking at.” ~ Buddhist Quote “There is nothing insignificant in this world. It all depends on the point of view.” ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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The Bridge On The River Kwai

The bridge on the 'river Kwai'

The bridge isn’t on the Kwai at all. The upper stretch of the Mae Klong river in the Kanchanaburi district of Thailand that the bridge straddles, was renamed Khwae Yai in 1960. Three years after the release of the epic multi Oscar winning David Lean movie!  I was aware that the movie had been shot […]

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The Serpent Guardians Of Indo China

Angkor Naga

Veneration of animals as symbols of powerful cosmic forces, far predated the advent of organised religion. The worship of serpents seems the most prominent and widespread among these animist beliefs, with evidence to suggest its practice across ancient civilizations ranging from the Hopi Indian tribes and Mayans in the Americas, to those in Egypt, India, […]

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Capturing Movement

My attempts to capture movement owe a lot to serendipity. Out of a dozen or more photos clicked while hubby fed these frenzied carp on the Chao Phraya river, I was confident I would have at least one half way decent shot. Depressions in the Bay of Bengal (during the North East monsoons) bring cyclonic […]

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Lunchtime Memories…

I almost always forget to click pictures when we sit down for a meal. I have been trying hard to remedy that, but I relapse sometimes. Like I forgot again yesterday, until most of my fish was demolished! Good conversation distracts me….and an inadequate breakfast. This gallery consists of a few lunchtime memories, that I […]

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Chasing Shadows….

Perspective and composition, in much of my photography, thus far at least, has been more instinctive and impulsive than deliberate! As has the capturing of light and shadow. I am in the process of learning to remedy that and pay more attention to the rules. In the meantime here is a selection of serendipitous shadows from our travels……. Shadow […]

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The Grand Gate On The Sea

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I spot the Otorii from across the expanse of the (Seto) Inland Sea, emerging from the waters like a giant Pi symbol against the dense green mantle of the hills beyond. More bleached terracotta than the vermilion of the postcards, this 52 feet high floating ‘grand gate‘ claims equal billing with Mount Fuji as the iconic symbol of […]

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Fortress In Focus!

The steel and concrete tower of the Osaka Castle is a 1995 restoration. Faithful to its Tokoguwa era splendour in appearance, and the final in a series of rebuilding attempts since its founding in the 16th century. The castle’s very modern interior houses a small but informative museum, with exhibits on the Shoguns (warlords), who were an intrinsic part of […]

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