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A Passion For Egypt

Plundered art and antiques, should rightfully be returned to their countries of origin and displayed in situ. So I believed, very passionately, until I learned of the burning of the Institute d’Egypte, near Tahrir square in Cairo in December 2011. And of the destruction of almost all the precious manuscripts it contained. Among them, it…

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The Elitist Cemetery Of Recoleta

At the end of calle Junin, behind a restored neoclassical portal supported by four tall Doric columns, is the repository of the collective history, heritage and memories of the city of Buenos Aires. The last landscape of its founding fathers. A city of the dead. Built in 1822 in the garden appropriated from the monks of the Order…

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Paris – Métro Station Cité

Cité, the only metro station on the Île de la Cité – the island where Paris began – is better known for its original, Hector Guimard designed, sinuous green cast-iron entrance (above). But its interior is no less appealing.Until next time…..happy travels no matter where life takes you.

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The Serpent Guardians Of Indo China

Veneration of animals as symbols of powerful cosmic forces, far predated the advent of organised religion. The worship of serpents seems the most prominent and widespread among these animist beliefs, with evidence to suggest its practice across ancient civilizations ranging from the Hopi Indian tribes and Mayans in the Americas, to those in Egypt, India,…

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The Karakuri Marionettes Of Takayama

We arrived late. And in the race up to the night festival and back, we left with little or no impression of this historic market town, in the heart of the larger Takayama city. On our return the next morning, after a night at an Onsen nearby, its medieval charm and picturesque setting, took us completely by surprise! Presiding over…

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The Takayama Hachiman Matsuri

No temple festival in India is complete without a procession of the temple chariot around town. Like the Rath Yatra of Lord Jagannath in Puri for example…..that incidentally gave the English language the word ‘Juggernaut’! Originating in the early 17th century, as thanksgiving for a good harvest, and to mark the onset of winter, the Takayama Hachiman…

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The Bohemian Barrio Of San Telmo

The barrio of San Telmo, named after the patron saint of seafarers San Pedro González Telmo, is where Buenos Aires began. Where the Spaniard Pedro de Mendoza founded the first settlement in the 16th century, that grew into one of the most important cities in South America. When its wealthy residents fled North and East after an…

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Egypt – The Twin Temples Of Abu Simbel

No history lessons today! There is plenty of that and fascinating details of the salvage and relocation of these amazing temples here and here.  This is an account of how we planned our visit. And what we would do differently if we are fortunate enough to return. There are two ways to get to Abu Simbel. Convoys – private and…

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The Eternal Guardians of Qin!

Excavations of grand tombs and mausoleums around the globe are witness to the ancient world’s preoccupation with death and the afterlife. But the grandest excavation by far, has to be that of the terracotta army of Emperor Qin in Xian. The on site museum is concealed under an unsightly hangar like building. The sheer scale of…

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